Use of onshore power systems increases in Baltic Sea

Use of onshore power systems increases in Baltic Sea

Rostock Port/nordlich

A total of 50 Baltic ports and four major cruise lines took part in the study

A new study, commissioned by Cruise Baltic, shows that the use of onshore power systems (OPS) is increasing amongst cruise ports in the Baltic Sea. 

The report, conducted by Bermello Ajamil & Partners Europe, reached out to 50 Baltic ports in 10 countries and four major cruise lines, that represent 83.4 per cent of the global fleet, including Carnival Corporation, MSC, Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings and Royal Caribbean Group.

OPS contributes towards sustainability within the cruise industry by allowing cruise ships to connect to land-based power grids and turn off their engines while in port, but high investment costs make it challenging for some ports and cruise lines to fund. The report found that 36 per cent of Baltic Sea ports are still discussing investments in onshore power whilst 32 per cent have either not considered investing in OPS or decided not to go ahead.

The cruise lines involved in the study will have at least 56 per cent of their overall fleet using onshore power by 2026. 

“Investments in OPS help the cruise industry to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, but to really succeed in doing so, ports and cruise lines must strengthen their collaboration,” said Claus Bødker, director of Cruise Baltic. “Many of our cruise guests are highly aware of the environmental impacts of travelling the world, and investments in OPS are a good way for cruise ports and the cruise industry to address these concerns as OPS eliminates air pollution and decreases the noise level at the ports.”

Read more about the Cruise Baltic study in the 2022 issue of Cruise & Ferry Itinerary Planning.
 

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Alice Chambers
By Alice Chambers
08 December 2021

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