Why is organic, durable flooring important on cruise ships?

Flooring brand wineo tells us why its new organic flooring solution is ideal for assignments at sea

Why is organic, durable flooring important on cruise ships?
PURLINE Sea has been developed specifically for maritime environments

This article was first published in the Autumn/Winter 2017 issue of Cruise & Ferry Interiors. All information was correct at the time of printing, but may since have changed.

From cruise liners to roll-on/roll-off ships, container ships, mega-yachts or oil rigs – modern shipbuilding and advanced offshore facilities require a lot of technical expertise as well as reliable and resilient technologies. The overriding aim is not only to withstand the challenges of the high seas, but also to offer people a modern and safe environment at sea.

With these applications in mind, flooring brand wineo has developed a special flooring solution: PURLINE Sea. Up to 90% of this product consists of renewable raw and natural fillers, with no chlorine, solvents or plasticisers. It is extremely durable and low-maintenance, and consequently long-lasting and economical. In the event of fire, thanks to its high-quality formula, PURLINE Sea develops no toxic gases and only minimal quantities of smoke. Escape routes thereby remain visible. It is resistant to chemical and mechanical influences and UV radiation, greatly reduces impact sound and, with R10, is extremely slip-resistant.

The collection comprises more than 100 individual and unique designs in both: plank and roll format. Whether in wood, stone or fantasy design, the latest digital printing technology enables wineo to make even the most individual design wishes come true for planners and architects.

PURLINE Sea conforms with all safety requirements under the current IMO regulations, has received many international environmental certificates and awards, and complies with existing SOLAS and EU regulations as well as the requirements of the US Coast Guard.

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Rebecca Lambert
By Rebecca Lambert
Friday, February 23, 2018